obrugman
TheBrain allows us to create knowledge graphs, may be even without being aware of it: we link objects with properties to other objects with properties, and we assign properties to relationships (link types, link tags), and we create patters of all of those. We link structured and unstructured information (text, video, websites etc) to those objects.

In more complex brains, for professional use, the amount of relevant information is more than we can possibly map in TheBrain (who hasn't stopped mapping for a while because of being tired from your brain not having the minimal completeness we need to make the brain a professional source to go to?
However, we face knowledge opportunities and complexity issues that go beyond this: when building a professional brain, there is lots of information, patters and relationships hidden in there that we haven't mapped as knowledge graphs, simply because the material we organised, classified, referenced and stored has knowledge in there that we weren't interested in or couldn't give priority when we mapped it. But there are names, places, collaborative relationships (think of multiple authors of a scientific article we stored in our brain) or even links with outside information that we may be interested in one day. For example, I have 50 people and their twitter accounts in my brain. I may be interested in seeing what theyt are tweeting on today. I would love to be able to select the names in my brain and then fire a search to twitter giving me a visual map of the themes they tweet on and the themes they share. I may want to see the social network of any person in my brain and see how they are connected in social media (social network analysis). This is all inside and outside brain knowledge combination. But I may want a visual knowledge graph representation of all documents in my brain that reference the location "Palo Alto" in my brain. I know we havfe a powerful search, but the visualisation does not allow me to discover the patterns, since the search results are a linear list. Remember the Panama Papers? the website disclosing this info provided visual links between people, themes, business names and places and moments in time. There are much more relations in the brain than the ones you map. These could be visualised and extracted. Or we could create a brain by just classifying a pile of unstructured documents we have automatically and extracting thoughts and their relationships automatically from that. The natural language processing technologies, visual knowledge graphing, automatic classification based on ontologies or semantic webs, social network analysis tools are all there. They could help to create the next version of TheBrain.  If not, TheBrain will one day be overtaken once Google Search offers these insights to a searcher.... My call to action: please investigate how you can bring tools to TheBrain that can help to automatically define objects, give them properties, classify them, link them, visualise the relationships and mine the contents to discover new relationships thereafter.
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obrugman
And can you make sure that the knowledge graphs TheBrain brains hold are at least compatible with Cypher, descriptive language standard for knowledge graphs? In that way, JSON exports could be fed into other automatic classification tools.
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