ruudhein
If there's one thing true on the web, it's that links break. The page linked to is moved, deleted, renamed. The whole domain disappears or is moved.

When it comes to information references I'm somewhat of a completionist or archivist.

My archiving strategy in TB looks like this:

  • drag URL to plex
  • press my shortcut to get the thought's folder address (in my case: CTRL ALT T)
  • in Chrome, activate the Save Page WE extension (in my case: ALT S)
    • paste thought folder before file name, adding \ at the end
    • → now I have an offline copy including images in a single file which can be opened by any modern browser
  • for some important references, activate the Archivor extension

Between these 2 I have a TB setup that guarantees URLs I wanted to have in my brain remain available, while the archive links can function as an external reference/validation where needed.

* I don't copy/paste/save the archive.org/archive.is links. The URL of the page itself is already in TB; I can just take that URL and run a search on either site.

** archive.is has some very nice features:
  • screenshot
  • downloadable copy
  • highlighting with link to highlighted copy
Using: Evernote | FilterizeEverdo | Dynalist | Liner | TheBrain v9.0.239.0
Quote
metta
Thanks for sharing your archiving strategy, Ruud. I'm very interested in taking a closer look and considering options for future brain projects.

In the meantime, I'm curious:
> Do you work primarily with a mega-brain, or multiple smaller brains?
> What is your criteria for determining when you save links only and when you save archived content?

The reason I ask is I'm wondering how quickly your archiving process would push the TB's 30G maximum storage allocation (per account, not brain) for all your stored web page attachments.

Some time ago I had hoped to use TheBrain as a comprehensive file manager, but I quickly realized this account limit would preclude that possibility.
Quote
ruudhein
I work with one mega-brain. It's been stagnant for a couple of years and I've done a big trimming recently but yes, mega-brain is the way to go for me.

I would say that if it's worth to go into my brain it usually is worth archiving. How I archive it depends on the future nostalgic or referential value.

Seeing "old stuff" back is fun and so when I've watched a movie with my wife, I add its IMdb page to my brain and save a copy of that page. 

When it's an important reference, something where you have to provide "proof", I at least use Archivor; a copy in archive.org and archive.is is often more valuable than a local copy. I may also make a local copy.

If it's "just" reference, a "how to" or so, I may just copy & paste into the note. Another solution I use often is to clip to Evernote, as a simplified article, highlight in Evernote, then export to HTML into the thought's folder.

The largest copies are the saved pages. These are usually 1.5-2mb.

Notes and Evernote HTML exports are quite small.

Another space saving option can be to "print" to PDF. E.g. Bon Cop Bad Cop 2 is 1.3mb saved, 400kb as PDF.  You can combine that with the Print Friendly extension to remove cruft or select only specific parts to "print"

Now for size I know 30GB looks small but I have 2 references that make me feel relaxed about it.

I have one Evernote database, my main "life", that has a reasonable number of PDF scans in it. It's 14,500+ notes large and is at almost 3 GB. This database goes back to 2004/2005.

Another database, just as old, has 20,000+ (correction: 45,000) reference notes, many with PDF, and is almost 20GB large.

So I feel pretty confident based on experience that my brain will fit for a long time.

As for file management, I've toyed with files in the brain for a bit but thinking about the people who come after me (e.g., my wife in case there would be something with me) the file system is easier to understand than the brain or it's folder structure. Some files I have a copy of in the brain but I prefer to link to files.

To make file linking as future-proof as possible I use the SUBST command on Windows to map a drive letter to the folder in which all my files are. This way I can link to X:\Pictures\thisphoto.jpg instead of c:\user\ruud\documents\whatever\etc. If the files move to another path, another drive, the SUBST command can point to that new location, still leaving the drive path in place.
So, this way I can have the benefit of using TB as a file manager and save space and be future-proof.
Using: Evernote | FilterizeEverdo | Dynalist | Liner | TheBrain v9.0.239.0
Quote
metta
Very much appreciate the additional feedback, Ruud. Helpful to know more about your archiving strategy, and encouraging to know you feel the 30G limit won't be a problem.

I also very much appreciate the additional resources (links) you're shared. I've bookmarked them all, and installed 2 of the plugins -- and I'm delighted to learn about the SUBST command in Windows. I have no previous experience working with DOS commands, so I'm looking forward to learning more and using this great shortcut option.

In addition, I appreciate your thoughts about file access for those who survive you. I have created an EOL (End of Life) section in my mega brain, with explanatory notes in a folder on my desktop that explains where and how to access my financial and legal records, online business accounts, passwords, etc. Relevant thoughts and notes are linked accordingly in this section of my brain, so I hope it will simplify the transition process after I am gone.
Quote
zenrain
Thanks Ruudhein, good info!
macOS 10.13
TheBrain 9.0.239
Quote
ruudhein
Pleasure to share with you good folks.

Quote: I have created an EOL (End of Life) section in my mega brain, with explanatory notes in a folder on my desktop that explains where and how to access my financial and legal records, online business accounts, passwords, etc. Relevant thoughts and notes are linked accordingly in this section of my brain, so I hope it will simplify the transition process after I am gone.

Very nice setup.

I have instructions both in Evernote and TheBrain but my real End of Life file is in LastPass. Encrypted the way the rest of LastPass is. I have added several people as a trusted contact. They can ask for access to my LastPass vault. When the request comes in I can accept or decline. If I don't do either, after a user-set time delay, access is automatically granted.

This setup allows me to share sensitive information.
Using: Evernote | FilterizeEverdo | Dynalist | Liner | TheBrain v9.0.239.0
Quote
metta
Great! Thanks for sharing this info about LastPass. Sounds like a great shared access option! :-)
Quote

Add a Website Forum to your website.