reasonablekamikaze
Pretty. Please.

Arrange Manually.png 
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rengel
You can 'manually' arrange thoughts by putting hidden numbers in front of the thought names, i.e.

.010 First
.020 Second
.030 Third
.040  Fourth

To be hidden, the numbers must be prefixed with '.', otherwise they will be shown as part of the thought's name.
Reinhard, TB 10.0.48.0, WIN 10

Quality is the result of attention paid to details.
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galenmenzel
Unfortunately if you don't set things up right at the beginning this can require a large number of manual edits to move a note from one place in the order to another.
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rengel
Yes, that's true.
Reinhard, TB 10.0.48.0, WIN 10

Quality is the result of attention paid to details.
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Cxiym
+ 1

Being able to manually change the order of thoughts would alleviate much of the tedium involved in using hidden numbers, especially when you need to constantly update the process, which requires moving thoughts around
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Cerebrum
One more problem with using numbers: You lose the ability to sort alphabetically by the actual name of thought.
Quite a bizarre implementation, just to avoid adding a numeric field.

It seems to me that selecting a "Manual option" for arranging thoughts would require being able to sort individual branches and then saving the manual sort order for the branch. Otherwise you would lose the manual arrangement whenever you select one of the other "Arrange by" options. This would be similar to the old Expanded View. Perhaps it was part of the "new Expanded View" that was in the works three years ago but then withdrawn.
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mdlynam
Not having a flexible/manual thought sort almost seems counter to TheBrain's design philosophy.
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galenmenzel
Funny, my impression is that not having manual thought sorting is right in line with TheBrain's design philosophy. TheBrain (version 10) offers very little in the way of customizing the graph layout. You create the graph; TheBrain figures out how to draw it for you.

It's for this reason that I personally don't use TheBrain for project planning. The layout is too static and inflexible for my needs. I use an outliner or something like that instead, with links to reference material that is stored in TheBrain. On the other hand, that very inflexibility (at least in terms of only showing a very small portion of the graph at once) is one of the reasons TheBrain can scale up to >10^5 nodes. I've never found anything better for a long-lived semantically linked reference data store.
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galenmenzel
Cerebrum wrote:
One more problem with using numbers: You lose the ability to sort alphabetically by the actual name of thought.
Quite a bizarre implementation, just to avoid adding a numeric field.

It seems to me that selecting a "Manual option" for arranging thoughts would require being able to sort individual branches and then saving the manual sort order for the branch. Otherwise you would lose the manual arrangement whenever you select one of the other "Arrange by" options. This would be similar to the old Expanded View. Perhaps it was part of the "new Expanded View" that was in the works three years ago but then withdrawn.


The dev team could do this by storing a "manual order index" in each link that determines the manual sort order. You don't want to store sort data in each child, because nodes can have multiple parents, and you don't want reordering under one parent to affect the order under another. And you wouldn't want to store sort data in the parent because then you're replicating graph information in the parent nodes, and you add a bunch of complexity to the graph-manipulation code to make sure that the parent-child info stored in the parent and the parent-child info stored in the actual graph don't get out of sync and start acting strange.
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mcaton
The manual ordering system (and older expanded view) is documented for review in a future version. In the mean time, the hidden ordering system that Rengal mentioned is a good option.  The alphabetical ordering would still apply if 2 child thoughts started with the same number...

Thank you,
Matt
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