mctrexler Show full post »
metta
@Gary ~
As a non-Evernote user, I'm very interested in your comment that searching in Evernote is neither "easy nor fun" since I just attended a recent Evernote Productivity webinar which claimed that searching in Evernote is one of it's strengths. However, it doesn't seem to compare to search in TheBrain, and I think your comments about this make good sense.

@Mark ~
Will be interested to see what you think of Plectica. Do keep us posted. Based on a quick peek at the features, I'm wondering about the validity of their claim about "how our brains actually function" since I could see no images anywhere in any of the Plectica screenshots -- in spite of the fact that the human brain responds so powerfully to visual cues.

Also, the connecting lines (which initially appear to be random) don't seem to provide the kind of visual relationship indicators available in TheBrain -- and once you get beyond 2 dimensions, will there be any way to visually connect (link) between multiple layers in a Plectica database?

In addition, for my brain projects I would sorely miss the option of creating longer notes, which I also didn't see in any of their screenshots.
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GaryW

Hi @Mark ~  @Metta ~

I haven't used Plectica so also interested in your chat with them. The linear layout reminds me of Trello and Realtimeboard which I use for collaboration purposes. 

It boils down to how best to structure knowledge. For me, rhizomes are better than trees. Here's a terrific YouTube video explaining the key differences.

TB offers freedom to expand in any direction and make new hyperlinks. I'm no brain surgeon but I think it parallels what neuroplasticity is all about - neurons (TB thoughts) firing off in one's head in every direction, banging into other neurons, and myelin sheathing forming new connections.

There's no question searching in EN is very powerful. They provide OCR capabilities which means non-editable PDF files are searchable. So are JPG images with words and even handprinted notes. What's not fun is doing a search and having a huge number of notes retrieved. For example, if I search "climate change" in my database with 22,000+ notes, I get 339 hits. So there's more work either clicking through or refining my search criteria.

I try to combine the best of both worlds. EN as my database and TB as my pattern recognizer. BTW, there is an issue which I raised with TB Support. When you paste an EN link into TB, you always get the same title: "Welcome Back". No biggy since you can edit the title but it's an extra step.

One more thought...I just read the book The Performance Cortex. Quite interesting. Some neuroscientists believe the real reason for the brain is to produce body movement. Consider the notion of "muscle memory". Muscles really aren't intelligent and are controlled by a part of brain. So how well does TB or Plectica enable "movement", in this case, movement of the mind to create new ideas via thought association? Perhaps it's a question worth posing to Plectica.

Life is what happens when we are busy making other plans.

2019 Mac 3.1GHz i5 16GB RAM: Catalina v10.15.5, Safari v13.1, Chrome 83.0.4103.97; 2018 iPad Pro: iOS v13.5.1

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ruudhein
Searching in Evernote is generally very easy, and with a bit of thinking based on how you notice you use Evernote, can be made super efficient.

Search in Evernote is about as fast as searching in Google. The difference is that Google applies varies algorithms to sort those results by relevance and importance.

In Evernote you get your results sorted by created or modified date, ascending or descending. If you want you can sort them alphabetically. 

Good note titles and optionally some tagging, be it using Evernote tags or just adding your own keywords, can make things a lot better. So in my case I can focus onto specific notes by doing an intitle: search or adding something like -tag😃iary

Generally where Evernote use (or search) goes off course for people is when you use it as a database of articles; a clipping tool. Clip 1000 climate change articles and certain searches become laborsome. 

In my use-cases I've found that I can better separate archiving (clipping) and notes/knowledge extraction. Instead of clipping a whole article, I put highlights in one note or make separate notes if needed. Archiving the article itself is a different story but you can leave it to sites dedicated to keeping copies of webpages by using a tool like Archiveror.

So then, in that way of using it, you can find one interesting article and extract several points from it, annotate it, save it.
Using: Evernote | Filterize | Roam Research | Feedly | Save Page WE | TheBrain v11.0.91.0

(Windows 10)
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GaryW
Judd: You correctly described how I am using Evernote - as a database. My main reason is as a premium member I get unlimited total storage with 10GB monthly upload. So I dump a variety of stuff ranging from newspaper clippings to client invoices into EN on my desktop iMac. To reduce EN storage space on my iPhone, I'll only offline sync the notebooks that I think I'll need in the field and keep the rest in the cloud.

I also like to extract key points from an article. Instead of making separate EN notes, I'll create new TB thoughts and paste the clipped portion into the Notes section. This quick read process works well with the iOS iPad and iPhone apps. 

With separate TB thoughts, I can then make as many links as I want with other thoughts. I initially tried using EN tagging but realized it doesn't manage Parent/Jump/Child relationships as well as TB does. A thought could be child in one relationship and a parent in another.

Regards,
Gary

Life is what happens when we are busy making other plans.

2019 Mac 3.1GHz i5 16GB RAM: Catalina v10.15.5, Safari v13.1, Chrome 83.0.4103.97; 2018 iPad Pro: iOS v13.5.1

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metta
@Mark ~

So what did you think of your Plectica demo?
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Peter93
I like the term "memex", never heard of it before! I find "brain" a bit misleading, because brains can do so much more than just associative memory storage. I like to think of it more like a "tool for thought", a term I use for applications in general that aid in thinking and memory. Other tools for thought I frequently use are "MindNode" (for quick, intuitive mindmapping), "MindMeister" (for more structured and elaborate mindmapping) and "CmapTools" (for exploration of ideas and conceptual work). I think there should be more such thinking tools out there with different approaches than classic mindmapping.
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enkidu
Just noticed this thread !

between me & me, I call them mindmaps
to show off to others, I call them "any-to-any linked data"


cheers
enkidu
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Rob2050
Picking up an old thread via search function. I have been looking into Systems Thinking as a graphical way of show relationships in complex system (say law enforcement, crime rates, community actions). I came across Plectica, not for doing what I do in The Brain, but more for a relationship diagram (to show many thinks on the screen at one time). I'd be curious if anyone has spent time with it?

https://www.plectica.com/examples


Kumu is another Systems Thinking modeling tool. Pletica is more general purpose, Kumu is very specifically systems thinking.
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mctrexler
@Rob2050 

I haven't played much with Plectica.  I did talk to the developers last year - and they were keen to convert my Climate Web megabrain to Plectica.  Never quite figured out how that would have worked!   Plectica strikes me as potentially very useful if you were putting together (in my case) climate change information focused toward decision-makers in a particular company.  But I've been so focused on the bigger picture on climate change that I haven't gotten to Plectica yet.  Let me know what you think!

Mark
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