Moltaire
Hello TheBrain Family,

I'm wondering: what other kind of programs you use for information management? I don't mean direct competitors like Evernote or mindmapping, but other things like databasing, visualizing, etc. I'm only using TheBrain now but would love to discover new possibilities!
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zenrain
  • DevonThink (macOS and iOS) - File Management, document storage, clipping and advanced searching
  • Tinderbox (macOS) - Visual Information pottering around (on and off)
  • TaskPaper (macOS) - Task management (lists)
  • Omnifocus (macOS, iOS) - Task management (mainly recurring tasks) 
  • Ulysses (macOS) - Place to type out drafts and misc notes before putting into TB
  • Hazel (macOS) - Filing automation
  • Keyboard Maestro (macOS) - Automation
  • Workflow (iOS) - Automation
  • Forklift (macOS) - Advanced Finder stuff
  • LaunchBar (macOS) - Launch/browsing/control
  • Pastebot (macOS) - Clipboard manager (I use over LaunchBar's and KM's because of the filters)
macOS 10.14.6
TheBrain 10.0.54
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shinyplastic
  • Search Everything (Win) - Quick file searching
  • File Locator Pro (Win) - Indexing HD especially PST files
  • Jello (Win) - Task management (need a replacement soon if not updated)
  • 2Do (iOS) - Tasks
  • Toodledo (Web) - Tasks with gSyncit / Outlook to tie Win / iOS together
  • Workflow (iOS) - Yep automation
  • OneNote (Win) - Notes
  • GoodSync (Win) - File syncronization
  • Breevy (Win) - Keyboard shortcuts
  • TidyTabs (Win) - Window tabs
  • Divvy (Win) - Window management
  • Mendeley (All) - Reference manager
  • MediaMoneky (Win) - Media database

Always though about DevonThink (unfortunately macOS only) - is it any good for home use (at work we have OpenText)?

Played with Bau DB (Win) - A hybrid access / Excel database, and used to love Taglocity / tag2find (both dead).

On a bit of a long term quest to find good tagging software that stores the tags in the file metadata (not a central database) on Windows.

But at home mainly The Brain and OneNote.
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zenrain
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Always though about DevonThink - is it any good for home use (at work we have OpenText)?


Depends, I use it for bill scanning, (I have Pro Office so it can OCR pdf's) legal documents, and quick web page archiving. Also, most .pdfs go into DevonThink and then are external attachments to TheBrain. If you have have a mac, and want to get your bills scanned and archived electronically, you can't beat DevonThink.
macOS 10.14.6
TheBrain 10.0.54
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zenfrog

Evernote: Bucket/archive/loose planning/habbit logging  
DevonThink Pro: Structured data for specific projects or areas of interest. 
Curio: Visual planning/Info Martialling 
iMIndMap: planning or distribution of easy read pretty mindmaps
TinderBox: Complex info martialling/thinking 
Scrivener: Writing 
Mellel: Writing 
Bear App: Draft Writing 
Workflowy (free): outlining
OmniOutliner: Outlining 
Nozbe: Task Management 
Bookends: References
Devon Pro Agent: Research 
Alfred pro: Automation 
Hazel: Automation 
DayOne: Diary/Journal
1password: private stuff & passwords
TheBrain: Thinking & Ideas.
BusyCal: Calendars
Toodledo: Lecture & Teaching Planning

My use waxes and wanes between various apps.

TheBrain, Evernote, Nozbe are the Three constants I would say. 

 

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GaryW
Knowledge Management
TB
Evernote
WikiLinks
Day One
 
Communication
Slack
Doodle
 
Project Management & Collaboration
Trello
Outliner Pro (iOS sync Evernote)
 
 
Research
Google Alerts
Flipboard
Feedly
Pinterest
We see the world not as it is but as we are.
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ruudhein
I try to keep my toolset as tight as possible.

  • Dropbox: backup
  • Dynalist: knowledge, info, how to, wish lists, note taking
  • Evernote (+ Filterize): manuals, personal stuff (journal/log/diary)
  • Gmail
  • Google Calendar: appointments & reminders
  • Google Keep: people info, reminders
  • Instapaper: anything I want to read or have read on the web
  • Feedly: article discovery + backup to Dropbox of anything I've read in Instapaper
  • Pinterest (for image collecting)
  • TheBrain
Using: Evernote | FilterizeDynalist | InstaPaper | Liner | PrintFriendly | TheBrain v10.0.58.0 + v11.0.17.0
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ruudhein
Oh, and to keep things straight in my mind, I have a "processing rules" thought in TheBrain:

1.jpg  Before I go looking for a new software toy, I check here; is there already a process, a flow here?

If not, then I go back up a level to my toolset and I look there: which software already does what I want to do?

Where possible I stick to programs I have. For example, I use Dynalist for checklists, clipped information, wishlists, recipes, but also for note taking and some writing.
Using: Evernote | FilterizeDynalist | InstaPaper | Liner | PrintFriendly | TheBrain v10.0.58.0 + v11.0.17.0
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zenfrog
ruudhein wrote:
Oh, and to keep things straight in my mind, I have a "processing rules" thought in TheBrain:

1.jpg  Before I go looking for a new software toy, I check here; is there already a process, a flow here?

If not, then I go back up a level to my toolset and I look there: which software already does what I want to do?

Where possible I stick to programs I have. For example, I use Dynalist for checklists, clipped information, wishlists, recipes, but also for note taking and some writing.


are you on Mac or Windows? 

What do you do when you have too many tools? Do you prune your software? Why google keep not Evernote? (and cut a tool)? 

Great at list though! Love the brain thought idea too (have copied you!)
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tcahill
I tend toward opensource, unless there is a special requirement for proprietary. (Cheers, TheBrain!)
  • LibreOffice. Primarily spreadsheets and writing.
  • Google:
    • Maps - all the time.
    • Drive - not as much anymore, but still pretty useful.
    • Keep - tones of unstructured notes, many get migrated to The Brain
    • Chrome - for now
  • Sketchup Make edition
  • Search Everything
  • MediaMonkey
  • Gimp - Raster images
  • Inkscape - Vector images
Be vewy quiet. I'm hunting wabbit.
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ruudhein
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are you on Mac or Windows? 


Windows

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What do you do when you have too many tools? Do you prune your software?


I used to. Now I rarely have to as I'm aware that I want to keep things simple. See also Evernote/Keep

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Why google keep not Evernote? (and cut a tool)?


Between TheBrain, Dynalist, Evernote, Keep, Google Assistant, and Calendar, some stuff sure got duplicated. I had a vague idea about what goes where, and that's when I made my processing rules setup; to have it clear for when it wasn't clear anymore.

Google Keep still is in the toolset, for now, as I use it for a walled-off set of notes, and sometimes for its reminder functionality. Ad hoc note taking itself is done in Dynalist. Evernote is my life's Google, so to say.

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Great at list though! Love the brain thought idea too (have copied you!)


The list of software itself is larger than what you see, but these are the rules that link to the specific programs. Happy you like the idea 🙂

It helps when I see a new software toy to go here and see "do I have this covered already?" And when a thought here gets more than one entry, it makes me think "do I need 2 things for essentially the same task?"


Using: Evernote | FilterizeDynalist | InstaPaper | Liner | PrintFriendly | TheBrain v10.0.58.0 + v11.0.17.0
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yuryg
I am on a Mac and here is the list of tools and Why:

For the Mac the following:
  • Personal Brain 8 - Wish I could go to 9 or 10 but without the export to HTML it is something I can not do. I export HTML out to my iPad to keep with me as I can not put work stuff on-line. Working for a very large security company and also being a security and infrastructure person for a Linux distribution I can not take a chance of an announced product, or an unknown security vulnerability getting out there. 
  • Notebooks - This is my quick gathering of notes, for including in to the brain. The ability to sync with the iPad allows me to take notes no matter where I am.  Especially writing in Markdown, HTML, text, etc.
  • GoodNotes (IOS / Mac) - This is turning out to be more and more the tool of choice for research and creation of PDF's with my thoughts. They are later imported in to TheBrain for long term storage. Big benefits are
    • Handwriting - and translation of handwriting in to searchable text.
    • Automatic export of PDF's as I write to Google (or other services) with fully searchable text in the PDF's (and Google is protected via a hardware key)
    • Ability to mark up PDF's and include graphics etc. 
  • OmniFocus - ToDo's 
  • Better Touch Tool - For the touch bar (Mac)
  • MyScriptStylus (No Longer available) - Due to my carpal tunnel syndrome, writing on the Wacom or the iPad is the only way I can still be working. 
  • SmallCube Mail Suite - to tag Email's, notes and so much more. 
  • Transmit - For moving stuff around (FTP / SFTP / Drive creation and management)
For the iPad the following:
  • Good Notes (as above) 
  • Notebooks (as above)
  • Nebo  - So that I can write word documents in an easy way using a stylus
  • OmniFocus (as above)
  • SImpleMind (even though a competitor) - Because I can not work online (See above) so that I can do some quick mind maps on the road and later on import in to TheBrain.
  • Good Reader (PDF Reader)
  • DayOne Journal - It is on-line but implemented with an encryption key so that without that static key no one can read the material. 
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obrugman
TheBrain: Research, personal knowledge/concept network.
Ulysses: writing in Markdown
Evernote: archiving, storing (and searching) handwritten notes, photos, event/conversation recordings, device independent filing (then put links to the docs in TB)
Evernote and TB also serve as each others back up, since EN company makes crazy unexpected moves, and TB nobody knows where it is going, so it can be one day off air without seeing it coming.
Day1: Journals
Furthermore I try to keep third party software use to an absolute minimum to protect integrity and speed of my devices and to control costs and to combat scattering of knowledge and files across apps.

The one thing that TB is bad at doing is structuring knowledge: it is all manual, if your views and knowledge change, the old structures do not meet their purpose......    it feels old school to have to classify and organize content by hand. I need automatic text extraction and automatic content classification, creating a brain structure of thoughts automagically
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ruudhein
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Evernote and TB also serve as each others back up, since EN company makes crazy unexpected moves, and TB nobody knows where it is going, so it can be one day off air without seeing it coming.


Data and system redundancy. Love it that you do that too. Most things that come in here go into 2 of 3 places. E.g. "how to"'s find there place in TheBrain and in Dynalist. Experience shows 100 year companies disappear and technology changes. Getting your data out isn't often the problem; getting it into something else is. By manually doing it right away there's no pain.

Dynalist makes me appreciate more standardized formats. If Dynalist goes under I can upload the opml files to Workflowy or drop it in my desktop outliner Bonsai
Using: Evernote | FilterizeDynalist | InstaPaper | Liner | PrintFriendly | TheBrain v10.0.58.0 + v11.0.17.0
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Xavier
Knowledge Management
TheBrain

Project Management & Organisation & Collaboration
NotePad++ (with my own lungage Todo)
Evernote
Toodledo
Atlassian Jira
Microsoft Project

Communication
Signal
Skype

Productivity and write
Antidote
PhraseExpress
Greenshot

Research
Qwant
Agent Ransack

Others
FreeFileSync
OsmAnd
Brave
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